Ascent Blog: Tag: College Students

What is EFC and What Does it Mean on FAFSA?
Sep 19, 2022 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Cosigners
Expected Family Contribution (EFC) determines how much financial aid you would receive based on your family's taxed and untaxed income,… Read More
What is FAFSA and How Does it Work?
Sep 15, 2022 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For Cosigners, For High School Students
The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) is a form current and future students need to fill out to… Read More
A Guide to Parent PLUS Loans
Mar 15, 2022 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For Cosigners
What are Parent PLUS loans, and should you look into one? Ascent Funding breaks down what Parent PLUS loans are… Read More
529 College Savings Plan: How to Save for Your Student’s College Fund
Jan 10, 2022 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Cosigners, For Parents and Cosigners
A 529 college savings plan is an investment plan to pay for various education costs. Learn more about 529 college… Read More
3 Ways to Address Student Loan Debt Fatigue
Dec 08, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students
Feeling emotionally drained, weary, or burnt out when it comes to your student loans? Do you see no end in… Read More
5 Ways to Overcome Fear of Student Loan Debt
Nov 29, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students
The topic of student loans can be scary and cause a lot of anxiety for students. Ascent Funding covers five… Read More
More than Just a Student Loan: What to Look for When Choosing a Private Student Loan
Nov 22, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For Cosigners, For High School Students
When it comes to choosing a private student loan lender, who you work with makes a big difference. Learn more… Read More
The Truth About Private Loans: Top 4 Myths Debunked
Oct 27, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For Cosigners, For High School Students
There are plenty of myths surrounding the idea of private student loans. Ascent Funding is here to debunk 4 common… Read More
How to Successfully Ask Someone to Cosign a Student Loan
Oct 13, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For College Students, For High School Students
Want to ask someone to be your student loan cosigner but are unsure how? Learn how to approach the conversation… Read More
How Much Student Loan Debt is Too Much? 5 Ways to Avoid Overborrowing
Sep 22, 2021 | By: Ascent
Categories: Blog, For Students, For High School Students
Over half of students overborrow during their time in college. Check out these helpful tips to avoid overborrowing student loans. Read More

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“text”: “According to FastWeb, ideally, your amount of student loan debt should be less than what you expect to earn your first year after graduation, typically your starting salary. If the amount you plan to borrow is equal to or more than your starting salary, it may be more challenging to pay your loans back after leaving school.

The amount of student loan debt you can afford to take on will depend on your expected expenses, income, budgeting skills, and lifestyle after graduation, as well as any other debts you may have acquired while in school. If you can make even a minimum payment while in school every month, this can help chip away at your total loan amount.”
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“text”: “Rules about returning overborrowed student loans will vary depending on which lender you choose.

If you borrowed money from the federal government, you have 120 days to send back any funds you don’t need without paying fees or interest. You might be able to return the money later (depending on your lender), but you may be responsible for any interest that accrues on it.
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When it comes to private student loans, requirements vary by lender. If you overborrow and want to repay the extra immediately, you will need to read your loan terms or contact your lender to see if this is possible."
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"text": "Your loan agreement should tell you how you can (and can’t) spend your loan money, even if you took on too much student debt. Some lenders allow you to spend it however you want, while others send the money directly to your school and only allow you to apply it toward school-related costs."
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